Who’s Keeping Score?

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


Do you ever feel like you are constantly losing or failing in that one area of your life you are trying so hard to be successful in? Do you ever know the “right” thing to do in a situation mentally but don’t actually act on that knowledge? It can be hard – especially for those of us who are in therapy or other forms of counseling and are doing the work to improve our mental health. Having head knowledge of how to change but not implementing it can make you feel terrible. It’s like, am I even trying to change? If I were, wouldn’t this be easier? If only our will alone could lead to long-lasting change. Continue reading Who’s Keeping Score?

Dealing with Disappointment

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


About half a year ago, I had started an application to my dream school, I knew the chances were slim but I was determined to set that aside and try my best. I went to almost every Zoom webinar and was encouraged by my friends, family, former teachers coaches, and even staff at this school. I worked on it for 8 months and when the deadline came around, I started counting the days until the decision. Then I was counting the hours. Then I was counting the minutes. Continue reading Dealing with Disappointment

Continuing to Check-In Post-COVID

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


Now that we can (hopefully) see the soon to be light at the end of the tunnel for the quarantine and the aftermath of the COVID pandemic, I want to make sure we continue to check-in with ourselves and our own mental health. Things are starting to open up again after over a year and things will slowly begin to work their way closer to “normal.” Continue reading Continuing to Check-In Post-COVID

My Experience at RE:SOLVE Residential Program

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


Over the past few weeks and months, like many others, I have been struggling immensely with my mental health. A series of panic attacks, depressive episodes, and anxiety-filled breakdowns have really spiraled out of control due to a mix of stressors from work, family, and more. It got to a tipping point earlier this month when I felt uncomfortable being alone, and that’s when I knew that I needed more help. Continue reading My Experience at RE:SOLVE Residential Program

A Minority in Mental Health: Asian Americans

The “model minority stereotype” of Asian Americans perceives them to be hardworking, and academically, economically, and socially successful when compared to all other racial minority groups. Because of this, Asian Americans are assumed to be at less risk of mental health problems. Then how do we explain that Asian American college students are 1.6 times more likely to seriously consider suicide than white students? And why is suicide the number one cause of death in Asian American teens?

Continue reading A Minority in Mental Health: Asian Americans

Again, what is happening to my body?

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.

This is a follow-up to a blog post yesterday talking about the unknown, physical symptoms that can be tied to mental illness. We encourage you to read both posts and have a conversation with your child about the physical symptoms that they may be experiencing but unsure where to place.


My body and my mind have not been communicating well with each other recently. From trembling fingers to tender thighs, I’m not sure what these neurological signs are telling me. I also link these symptoms to anxiety, though. And, maybe this is ironic, but when I make the connection that these feelings are just physical manifestations of my anxiety, I don’t worry. My stomach has been hurting from anxiety since 3rd grade. That was normal; this is new. And because it’s new, I’m not sure if it is normal. Continue reading Again, what is happening to my body?

What is my body telling me? I am listening, but I can’t understand.

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


I remember being complimented once by a therapist for being so “self-aware” and “in tune” with my emotions. This is true. I tend to be a person who can recognize a feeling and communicate how this feeling affects me to other people. But recently I’ve been having a more difficult time unpacking my physical and emotional feelings.

It’s like it will hit me out of nowhere; a gust of stress will push against me from behind and remind me that I am still three days behind on that paper. Almost always, I breathe out a sharp but exhausted, “F*ck!” to myself. This hot wave washes over me and I resume whatever activity I’m in the middle of, like cooking or other work. Sometimes, especially at the beginning of the day, it feels like my skin is too tight for my body. Or as if the outfit I’m wearing was purposely intended to make my whole body’s nerves unbearably active. Or sometimes it feels like my body is completely devoid of all organisms inside; I gaze at myself in the mirror, but I feel only air beneath the skin I see. Maybe my skin has a cool numbness sensation on it? This feeling of weightlessness isn’t relaxing or dreamy. It actually makes the emptiness of my brain feel more real in my body. After I feel this, I can almost promise you I won’t accomplish any other task after that moment.

These visceral reactions to the events around me happen very frequently. My body talks to me throughout the day; I listen, but I am confused. This are new messages being sent to me, unusual messages that I am not used to receiving. I suppose it will just take time and more self-reflection. I would appreciate any feedback you may have.


Does your body have strong physical reactions to stress? Does your child? Have you talked to your child about how they feel when they experience stress?

Mood Tracking

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


The past month has been difficult for me with new mental health symptoms, diagnoses, and medications. Because of my new symptom of fluctuating between having very little energy or motivation and then feeling very motivated and over-confident, my health care team has assigned me the task of completing a daily mood trackerContinue reading Mood Tracking