Is Not Using Smartphones Actually Bad for Your Mental Health?

The popular narrative says that social media, smartphones, and constantly being online has had a negative effect on our mental health, especially for adolescents. It can be difficult not to be bogged down by comparing ourselves to others, wanting validation for content that we create through likes and comments, or feeling confused and anxious about a possible passive aggressive postContinue reading Is Not Using Smartphones Actually Bad for Your Mental Health?

Why has Juul Attracted So Many Adolescents?

Chances are, you’ve heard of JUUL. Like any phenomenon and trend, the word itself may cause an immediate response: recognition, mocking, maybe even confusion. But like any phenomenon or trends, especially one that’s mostly popular with teenagers and young adults, everyone has an opinion on them. Continue reading Why has Juul Attracted So Many Adolescents?

Relationships and Social Media

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives.


Social media is pervasive in most of our lives. This is especially true for teenagers and young adults, who are the first generation to spend their formative years online. Online access and connection is unarguably beneficial for many people, but it can also have negative consequences for mental health. Continue reading Relationships and Social Media

Self-Confidence and the “Iceberg Theory”

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives.


As I scroll through Instagram, I see amazing musicians on tour and playing complex songs. As a musician myself, I ask why I can’t do what they do. Why aren’t I as talented? Why aren’t I as successful? Maybe you’ve been in this position with your own success. Continue reading Self-Confidence and the “Iceberg Theory”

The Neuroscience Behind How We Use Instagram

Using social media can feel like a mindless activity. Most of the time, we’re opening apps and scrolling and before we know it, it’s been an hour of alternating between apps and retaining absolutely nothing about what you just saw and who you interacted with. Using social media is a way for our minds to go on autopilot, spending time on your phone to kill time in line, in class, and when you’re lying down to put off going to bed. Continue reading The Neuroscience Behind How We Use Instagram

How Younger Generations Meme about Therapy Online

If there’s one benefit to Twitter, it’s the memes. Even if you don’t use the platform, you’ve probably seen screenshots of tweets on Instagram or Facebook. A recent trend in memes is an imaginary conversation that the person has with their therapist. Continue reading How Younger Generations Meme about Therapy Online

Being Left on Read

We’ve all done it: we get a message from someone and whether we intend to or not, never respond. We’ve all had the opposite done to us too: we send a message to someone, and they just never respond.

Being left on read (or being ignored when sending a message to someone) isn’t exactly the best feeling. Tons of thoughts and questions can go through our head. Did I say the wrong thing? Should I have worded this better? Am I being annoying? Do they not want to talk to me? Do they even like me? Continue reading Being Left on Read

Do We Use Instagram to Seek Belonging?

Because of the predictably social feature of social media, using these sites and apps have had an influence on how we interact with others and how we want others to see us. One recent study looked specifically at Instagram and researched just what drives us to interact with others on the app, focusing specifically on our desire to belong.

Continue reading Do We Use Instagram to Seek Belonging?