The Problem with Autoplay and Posting Triggering Images Online

The blog post includes mentions of police brutality and violence on black people. Please read with caution if any of these items triggers or upsets you.


The world can feel bleak and hopeless at times, and our access to news literally anywhere in the world at any time makes this much more obvious. And while this bleakness and hopelessness can be depressing and very easily overwhelming, it can also make us aware of injustices and give us a place to make a change. Continue reading The Problem with Autoplay and Posting Triggering Images Online

Staying Together, Apart

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


Like many others, I have been struggling with being away from friends and family during this quarantine. From a family member passing away without a proper ceremony, to loved ones that I used to see at will, to simply missing my friends and social life, I am struggling.  The uncertainty of quarantine – how long it will last, when the next restriction will be placed or even when one will be lifted – is what makes this the most difficult. If we knew that in a week it would be safe to get back to visiting normally, many people would be relieved. But, we are not lucky enough to have that kind of foreseeing. Continue reading Staying Together, Apart

Social Media Spike

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives. We hope you can use their post to start a conversation with your adolescent.


Is it just me or am I going on social media platforms way more than usual? I think this is a trend that I can attribute to the COVID-19 pandemic. Being quarantined, having a stay-at-home-order, and being scared to leave the house leaves me with one thing I have abundantly more of now. Time. Continue reading Social Media Spike

Help Your Child Determine What Social Media Platforms May be Negatively Impacting Them

How many social media accounts do you have? A Pew research study found that about 75% of adults have more than one social media account. This number is likely to be pretty high in teens and adolescents who grew up with technology and social media.

Not all social media platforms are created equal, though. Some serve different purposes, like how some are likely to use Twitter for news and Instagram to share their creative photography. Despite these different purposes however, there’s been a lot of overlap now that these platforms share a lot of features and have a lot of users on them.

With that all being said, the aesthetics of the site, the people you follow, and how those people share and post content can affect you differently depending which one you’re on. For some, these different feelings might be obvious, but it’s likely that you’re unable to tell because of the sheer amount of accounts that you may be cycling through. After a while, using these sites may all blur together, which may also contribute to that overwhelming, stressful feeling you might get by spending a lot of time on social media.

If it seems like your child is feeling overwhelmed by social media, or even if it seems like they’re mentally not feeling their best, it might help to have them apply some organization tips towards their phone, tablet, or computer. By spending a few minutes on the social media platforms they’re actively using, they can attempt to separate them and spend some time asking themselves questions about how each make them feel.

They can write down these feelings about each platform, and afterwards take a few minutes to see which exactly are causing particular stronger negative emotions. They can ask yourself questions such as, “Why is this platform making me feel like this?” “Is this platform worth keeping?” “How can I improve my experience on this platform?”

Hopefully, by taking a step back and evaluating exactly which platforms are affecting them and why these platforms are doing so can give your child some time to self-reflect and find ways to improve not just their social media experience, but their mood and mental health overall.


What are the social media platforms that you use the most frequently? What about your child? Do you have more than one? Have you noticed if you feel differently depending on which one you’re on?

Navigating the Internet with Social Anxiety

It’s not uncommon to be anxious to meet new people or be in a new, unfamiliar environment. It’s also not uncommon to feel terrified before performing something in front of a crowd, whether it be alone or with others. It’s also not uncommon to even feel a little bit nervous meeting people you’re comfortable with and know pretty well. Continue reading Navigating the Internet with Social Anxiety

Curating a Personally Positive Social Media Experience

While it’s impossible to tell everyone that you’re following on any of your social media platforms what they should be posting, it can sometimes be tempting to. This is true now more than ever: there are common themes of the kinds of posts that you’ve likely seen on your feeds, and while some are more helpful than others, it can get overwhelming, stress-inducing, and quite frankly, just not the type of content that you want to see right now. Continue reading Curating a Personally Positive Social Media Experience

Mental Health Experts on Social Media

When people talk about social media and its effect on people, it’s almost always negative. Many have mentioned and researched about the effect of social media on mental health: feeling unproductiveworrying about what we said or did online, and experiencing FOMO are just a few of the things that affect us from using social media. Continue reading Mental Health Experts on Social Media