Organizations for Mental Health and Youth Around the World

Everyone’s experience with mental health and how they handle it are different. This is especially true on a global scale: no two countries provide the exact same treatment and share the exact same stigmas and beliefs about mental health.

Continue reading Organizations for Mental Health and Youth Around the World

Therapy Isn’t for “Crazy People”

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives.


Therapy often has a bad connotation. Many people associate therapy with being “crazy.” By crazy, I mean someone who may experience delusions or engage in highly erratic behavior. I have heard a plethora of people avoid going to therapy simply because they believe “it’s for crazy people.”
Continue reading Therapy Isn’t for “Crazy People”

Therapy: Myths vs. Reality

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives.


Interested in therapy, but not sure what to expect? Maybe you’ve heard some therapy horror stories, or seen some memes online that have deterred you from seeking services? As somebody who has seen a number of different therapists, I’ve learned that a lot of the societal beliefs of therapy and stigmas against therapy are entirely unfounded and untrue. Most importantly, therapy is not at all as scary as it may seem.

Continue reading Therapy: Myths vs. Reality

Tackling Stigma

 

magnifying-glass-1607160_1920


The topic about how 
stigma can affect how we view mental illness is not new. The way that people talk about mental illness can not only impact how we view those with mental illness, but how we can view our own. We’ve talked about stigma several times before, because it’s important to change this mindset and the harmful effects that it can have.

There have been many efforts and attempts to change the conversation, especially online. One such way is through the governmentMentalHealth.gov provides content from other government organizations such as the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and NAMI and uses the site as a resource for information about mental health. One of their primary goals is to tackle the conversation (or lack of) about mental health and create a new one within communities to help normalize it.

One of their pages focuses specifically on stigma, and even more specifically, presents it as a fact sheet. Here, they present a common “myth” about mental health that can contribute to the stigma and a more negative way about how people can handle their mental illnesses. Not only do they cover the myths that people believe in about those who have a mental illness, but they also debunk ones about to help others. These include how thinking that there’s no use in helping others because they’re a “lost cause” and that it’s impossible to prevent. The site also links to external resources with some of their facts to provide more information.

You can check it out here.


What are other myths you can think of about mental health? How do you think people can change the way they talk about mental health? Let us know below in the comments!

Can Schools Influence Stigma?

Our environments can have a powerful impact on how we view things, especially in how we view the things about ourselves. Because adolescents spent a lot of time in school, their teachers, their classmates, and the content that they learn can influence how they interpret information. This also includes mental health: conversations with peers and the ways that teachers talk about their expectations on students can have subtle, but lasting effects.

Continue reading Can Schools Influence Stigma?

There’s No Shame in Taking Antidepressants

The SOVA Project is happy to feature this blog post written by one in our team of fantastic SOVA Ambassadors—these are young people who help create meaningful blog posts from adolescents’ perspectives.

I was about four years into my battle with depression when I began taking Lexapro. I had been in and out of therapy in the preceding years, and each therapist I visited asked if I’d be interested in taking medication if my condition warranted it. I always said yes, but my mother was less enthusiastic about the prospect of me taking antidepressants. Continue reading There’s No Shame in Taking Antidepressants

Can You be Extroverted and Have Social Anxiety?

Our minds often give us images of certain types of people when we think about certain things. For example, we tend to think of those with anxiety to be by themselves, preferring to be alone and in the quiet. It can be easy and even confusing to separate introversion and social anxiety, since both include a preference of being alone and away from crowds. Even though there are significant differences, the assumption is that most people with social anxiety are also introverts, and that the two go hand in hand.

Continue reading Can You be Extroverted and Have Social Anxiety?

Do You Hold a Stigma on Mental Health?

The stigma that people can hold isn’t a new topic by any means when discussing mental health, but that doesn’t take away from the fact that the stigma is still harmful. Though the conversation about mental health has become more open, whether it be from celebrities opening up about their experiences or the variety of apps to use as an outlet, it can still be terrifying for people to be honest about their own mental health. Continue reading Do You Hold a Stigma on Mental Health?